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Along the lines of GCE, here are some prices
Posted Thursday Sep 18th, 2014 01:38pm
by Joshua Drake
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I was doing some research for a customer who wanted to know where the real value to performance is. Here are some pricing structures between GCE, AWS and Softlayer. For comparison Softlayer is bare metal versus virtual.

GCE: 670.00
16 CPUS
60G Memory
2500GB HD space

GCE: 763.08
16 CPUS
104G Memory
2500GB HD space

Amazon: 911.88
16 CPUS
30G Memory
3000GB HD Space

Amazon: 1534.00
r3.4xlarge
16 CPUS
122.0 Memory
SSD 1 x 320
3000GB HD Space

Amazon: 1679.00
c3.8xlarge
32 CPUS
60.0 Memory
SSD 2 x 320
3000GB HD Space

None of the above include egress bandwidth charges. Ingress is free.

Softlayer: ~815 (with 72GB memory ~ 950)
16 Cores
RAID 10
4TB (4 2TB drives)
48GB Memory

Softlayer: ~1035 (with 72GB memory ~ 1150)
16 Cores
RAID 10
3TB (6 1TB drives, I also looked at 8-750GB and the price was the same. Lastly I also looked at using 2TB drives but the cost is all about the same)
48GB Memory


Categories: Business, OpenSource, PostgreSQL, Python, SQL

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GCE, A little advertised cloud service that is perfect for PostgreSQL
Posted Monday Sep 15th, 2014 09:48am
by Joshua Drake
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Maybe...

I have yet to run PostgreSQL on GCE in production. I am still testing it but I have learned the following:

  1. A standard provision disk for GCE will give you ~ 80MB/s random write.
  2. A standard SSD provisioned disk for GCE will give you ~ 240MB/s.

Either disk can be provisioned as a raw device allowing you to use Linux Software Raid to build a RAID 10 which even further increases speed and reliability. Think about that, 4 SSD provisioned disks in a RAID 10...

The downside I see outside of the general arguments against cloud services (shared tenancy, all your data in a big brother, lack of control over your resources, general distaste for $vendor, or whatever else we in our right minds can think up) is that GCE is current limited to 16 virtual CPUS and 104GB of memory.

What does that mean? Well it means that it is likely that GCE is perfect for 99% of PostgreSQL workloads. By far the majority of PostgreSQL need less than 104GB of memory. Granted, we have customers that have 256GB, 512GB and even more but those are few and far between.

It also means that EC2 is no longer your only choice for dynamic cloud provisioned VMs for PostgreSQL. Give it a shot, the more competition in this space the better.


Categories: Business, OpenSource, PostgreSQL, Python, SQL

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PDXPGDay 2014
Posted Monday Sep 8th, 2014 11:54am
by Joshua Drake
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I had the honor of being asked to give the introduction at PDXPGDay 2014 this past Saturday. I didn't speak very long but it was great to see a lot of the old stomping ground. It had been quite some time since I had been in the group of Wheeler, Roth, Wong, Berkus and a few others.

The conference was really a mini-conference but it was great. It was held in the exact same room that PostgreSQL Conference West was held all the way back in 2007. It is hard to believe that was so long ago. I will say it was absolutely awesome that PDX still has the exact same vibe and presentation! (Read: I got to wear shorts and a t-shirt).

Some items of note: Somebody was peverse enough to write a FUSE driver for PostgreSQL and it was even bi-directional. This means that PostgreSQL gets mounted as a filesystem and you can even use Joe (or yes VIM) to edit values and it saves them back to the table.

Not nearly enough of the audience was aware of PGXN. This was a shock to me and illustrates a need for better documentation and visibility through .Org.

The success of this PgDay continues to illustrate that other PUGS should be looking at doing the same, perhaps annually!

Thanks again Gab and Mark for entrusting me with introducing your conference!


Categories: Business, OpenSource, PostgreSQL, Python

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apt.postgresql.org... a wonderful if flawed apt repository
Posted Wednesday Sep 3rd, 2014 10:52am
by Joshua Drake
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The site apt.postgresql.org is a great resource for those who live in the Debian derived world. It keeps up to date with the latest postgresql packages and has a whole team dedicated to creating these packages. Of course, this is the Open Source world so not everyone agrees 100% with the way things are done in this project. As I noted here, there are some issues.

These issues are not to detract from otherwise excellent work but a note to those who use the repository to look for further problems. I also have a video displaying specifically what the issues are, here.



Categories: Business, OpenSource, PostgreSQL, SQL

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